Occupational Medicine

DOT Medical Examination

Preparing You to Drive in a Commercial Environment

Department of Transportation (DOT) Medical Examination Expectations

The exam is federally regulated by DOT and has specific qualifications that must be met for the candidate to drive. You will be asked to fill out a questionnaire about your health history. Your blood pressure, vision and urine will also be checked, and additional urine may be collected for drug testing. A physical exam also will be completed by a medical provider according to the DOT guidelines.

The details of the physical qualifications of drivers can be found in 49 CFR 391.41 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration regulations.

Potential disqualifications for drivers include:

  • Loss of foot or handgrip.
  • Diagnosed with unstable angina, current coronary disease or congestive heart failure.
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure.
  • Epilepsy I seizure disorder.
  • Psychiatric disorder.
  • Vision in either eye that cannot be corrected to 20/40 or better.
  • Uncontrolled diabetes.
  • Amphetamine, narcotic, other habit-forming drug or potentially sedating medication use.
  • Current clinical diagnosis of alcoholism.
  • Diabetes (Sugar) requiring Insulin to control.
  • Sleep disorder — sleep apnea or use of C-PAP.

Applicants must bring with them:

  • Drivers license with a photo.
  • Eyeglasses if needed.
  • The name, address and telephone number of your personal physician in case our examiner requires additional information about your health.
  • Any and all medications in the original bottles that you take. If that is not possible, bring a list of the names of the medications, dosages and name of the prescribing physician for each.

You can help avoid delays and improve odds of a successful outcome by following these suggestions:

High Blood Pressure

The DOT standard for blood pressure is no higher than 140/90. Any reading above this standard will result in disqualification or withholding medical clearance until the blood pressure is below this level.


If you have diabetes controlled by medication and diet, bring a statement from your physician that says:

  • Your diabetes is under good control.
  • There have seen no episodes of hypoglycemia (dangerously low blood sugar) within the last two years.
  • You are safe to operate a commercial motor vehicle without restrictions. Also, ask your physician to include a recent Hemoglobin A1C level to help us understand your control of blood sugars.

Heart Condition

If you have had a heart attack (MI), by-pass (CABG), angina (chest pain) or angioplasty (stents), bring a note from your cardiologist that your disease is stable, without symptoms, and you have had a negative treadmill exercise stress test through Bruce Stage II or equivalent since your incident or within the last year, whichever is most recent.

Sleep Disorder

If you have a sleep disorder, bring a note from a sleep disorder specialist listing medications and devices used to treat the disorder. The note should state that your condition is stable and you are not at risk for excessive daytime sleepiness and can safely drive a school bus or commercial vehicle.

For more information, call (706) 845-3075.